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Puddle Ducks

March 31, 2018 @ 9:00 am2:00 pm

Meet: 9:00 am at the Clearwater Arena or 10:00 am at the St Clair National Wildlife area. Tens of thousands of ducks and other waterfowl use the Lake St. Clair wetlands as a migratory stop over. In this case, we will be viewing mainly puddle ducks (aka dabblers) such as American widgeon, northern shoveler, wood duck and pintail to name a few. Lunch at Mitchell’s Bay.

Leader: Deryl Nethercott

Canadians and Climate

March 26, 2018 @ 7:00 pm9:00 pm

Social gathering to start at 7:00 pm. Join other members for refreshments. Presentations will begin at 7:30 pm.

Throughout the 19th and 20th centuries, the predecessor agency of Environment Canada encouraged its daily weather observers to make remarks about the changing seasons, extreme weather, etc. but it never figured out a way to use these remarks. With the Environment Canada collection of weather observations now at Western, Prof. Alan MacEachern is studying what they tell us about Canadians and climate.

Saturday, April 14th, 2018

Camlachie United Church

 

The business meeting and general elections take place at 4:30 pm.

Bucket draw opens at 5:00 pm.

Dinner is served at 6:00 pm.

Matt Ellerbeck will be the guest speaker.

Matt Ellerbeck is a noted advocate and conservationist known as “The Salamander Man”. He is bringing the message of salamander preservation to Lambton Wildlife. Matt’s presentation will feature a variety of live salamanders for people to meet up-close!

February 26, 2018 @ 7:00 pm9:00 pm

Social gathering to start at 7:00 pm. Join other members for refreshments. Presentations will begin at 7:30 pm.

Biomimicry connects us in ways that fit, and integrate the human species to the natural processes of Earth. There are 3.8 billion years of brilliant solutions from which humankind can learn. Join Kimberly Gledhill to look at applications that have been applied and used to innovate for a better world.

Down River Ducks and Eagles

February 4, 2018 @ 9:00 am5:00 pm

Meet 9:00 am at the Centennial Park parking lot. This is our most popular outing. See waterfowl including diving ducks, geese and swans, as well as different gull species and bald eagles. Lunch at a restaurant in Sombra.

Leader: Paul Carter 519-466-8555

January 29, 2018 @ 7:00 pm9:00 pm

Social gathering to start at 7:00 pm. Join other members for refreshments.  Presentations will begin at 7:30 pm.

The Howard Watson Trail…How it came to be.   Each year thousands of people walk, run and cycle along the Howard Watson Nature Trail. Presenters Fernand Noel and Sheila White will review the events surrounding the creation of LWI’s biggest contribution to Sarnia’s community.

Twenty three LWI members ventured out on a cool fall day to walk the nature trail on the Fairbank Oil property just outside of Oil Springs.  Larry Cornelis led the hike and the group was fortunate to also have the property owners Charlie Fairbank and Pat McGee accompany us to provide some wonderful stories about the history of the property and the oil industry, as well as to explain the various oil production devices and artifacts found along the trail.  Charlie’s ancestors were prominent in the oil business dating back to the first oil wells.

The Fairbank property sits above the large oil field that spawned the oil exploration and extraction industry in the mid 1850’s, and the field continues to produce oil to this day from numerous wells located all over the property.  Many small oil pumps are visible along the trail, dutifully moving up and down to pull the crude oil up from a depth of close to 400 feet.  The unique aspect of the Fairbank approach to oil extraction is that many of these oil wells are using technology from the 1800’s.  The site is being considered as a Unesco World Heritage Site, and Charlie had recently returned from Ottawa where he made a presentation in support of the application.

Vintage Oil Well Pump

The trail entrance, with parking, is located on Gypsy Flats side road just south of Oil Springs Line.  The well-maintained trail meanders through prairie and riparian areas along Black Creek.  There are numerous signs indicating sections of the trail that are named for historical figures from the local oil industry.  A sturdy and attractive bridge crosses Black Creek and we were told that birds nest under it each year.  Larry Cornelis has conducted wildlife surveys on the property over several years, with many species being observed.  Although not many birds, insects or animals were seen on this day, it’s certain that in spring and summer there would be lots to see.  Tallgrass prairie species have been planted in many of the areas of this trail, with plans to continue to naturalize the property.

 

 

 

It’s a breath of fresh air when generous people allow the public to access their property and enjoy the natural beauty that resides there.   We appreciate the creation of this nature trail and encourage all LWI members to visit.

Further information about the history of the local oil industry can be found by visiting the Oil Museum of Canada, located a very short distance from this nature trail. https://www.lambtonmuseums.ca/oil/

Christmas Bird Count

December 16

Participate in the Pinery / Kettle Point CBC and help count all the birds in the count area and stay for the chili dinner and compilation at the park visitor centre.

Contact Tanya Berkers

November 27 @ 7:00 pm9:00 pm

Social gathering to start at 7:00 pm. Join other members for refreshments. Presentations will begin at 7:30 pm.

How long can a mussel live? How many species of mussels have been found in the Sydenham River? How many are species at risk? Erin Carroll, manager of biology with the St. Clair Conservation Authority, will explain the significance of mussels. They aren’t just clams.