About Author

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Mark & Roberta Buchanan

Roberta and Mark Buchanan are nature enthusiasts who are always eager to share their outdoor experiences with others. Roberta is a retired educator with a passion for birding, and Mark is a retired engineer who enjoys photography.

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A BIG Thank You to all of the volunteers who came out to help with the Mandaumin Woods Nature Reserve spring clean-up. On Sunday April 6 nine volunteers enjoyed a beautiful spring morning clearing rotting planks, trimming trails, and picking up garbage.  On Tuesday April 16 we had 14 brave souls come out on a cold, rainy morning to continue the clean-up of the trails! Again thank you to all of the volunteers for helping to take care of Mandaumin Woods Nature Reserve.

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Once again the projects at the annual Lambton County Science Fair were outstanding.  The Lambton Wildlife Inc. Natural Environment Award is presented to the students whose project best demonstrates a keen interest in Nature and the Environment.  A total of seven cash awards were presented to deserving students during the Awards Ceremony on Saturday April 5, 2019.

Here is a list of the winners of the Lambton Wildlife natural Environment Award:

Riley Edmunds and Warren Kimball (Carbonated Water vx. Tap Water, which one works better?)

Nithilan Sathish (Green Plastics)

Cyndi Rayson (Does eco-friendly soap lye?)

Ryleigh Murdock and Lizzy Kuykendall (Beans Beans)

Isabelle Robert (All A-BOAT Sulphur Emissions)

Ameera Almalki (Garbage to Some Treasure to Others)

Jessica Feniak and Parker Murdock (Salty Solution)

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Due to high winds forecast up to 60 KPH, tomorrow’s event has been cancelled. There are too many dead ash trees in the woods that could be blown down in high winds.  Sorry for any inconvenience.

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Due to high winds up to 60 kph being forecast, this event is cancelled.  There are numerous dead ash tress in the woods with the potential to be blown over.  Sorry for any inconvenience.

Contact: Roberta Buchanan (roberta.buchanan@icloud.com or 519 864 1475)

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Hawk Cliff is recognized as one of the prime fall migration hawk watching destinations in all North America.

 

Every year hundreds of birders (and non-birders!) from Canada, the U.S. and other countries visit Hawk Cliff. Birders can normally expect to see 15 different raptor species, with typical count totals reaching several thousand birds per day. On a few exceptional occasions lucky visitors have witnessed the amazing spectacle of over 100,000 raptors of various species migrating past Hawk Cliff in a single day!

Others come to enjoy the many song birds and Monarchs that also pass Hawk Cliff on their journey to warmer climes, or to walk the beautiful trails of Hawk Cliff Woods. This is a stunning 230 acre property and is one of the most significant deep interior forests in Elgin County. Hawk Cliff Woods is a maple-beech forest with many Carolinian specialties, including the Tulip-tree and Pignut Hickory as well as the Endangered Butternut and American Chestnut.   Rare birds such as Eastern Wood-Pewee, Acadian Flycatcher, Louisiana Waterthrush, and Wood Thrush thrive in the deep woods.

Please Contact Roberta Buchanan at roberta.buchanan@icloud.com or by phone 519-864-1475.

Date:  September 22, 2018

Place:  Lambton Mall parking lot – Carpooling is an option as it is an 80 minute drive.

Time: 8:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.  (bring your lunch or visit nearby Port Stanley for lunch)

Daily Live-bird Demos at 11a.m. and 2 p.m.

What to Bring:  water, insect repellent, hat, sunscreen, lawn chair, binoculars, lunch

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Point Pelee National Park is an amazing park filled with natural wonders. There is a large diversity of habitats, from the sheltered canopy of the southern Carolinian forest to the expansive sea of cattails in the marsh. In autumn, songbird migration is in full swing, while dragonflies and Monarch butterflies drift by.

 

For further information visit the Lambton Wildlife Website: http://lambtonwildlife.com/blog/point-pelee-national-park-camping-trip-2017/

Please Contact:

Paul Carter at 519-466-8555.

Date:  September 4-7, 2018 (Please note the change in dates from the program)

Place:  Point Pelee National Park

Time:   Anytime Tuesday through Friday – When you arrive at the front gate let them know that you are with the Lambton Wildlife Group

What to Bring:  Camping gear, bicycles, canoe (if you have one – rentals are available)

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What a beautiful day for a paddle!  The weather looked threatening but by 9:30 it had cleared up and the sun even came out.  We began our paddle at the Wilkesport Boat launch and a few minutes after leaving we were lucky enough to see a muskrat swimming along the shore.

Where the Sydenham splits into Bear and Black Creek we stopped and talked about the numerous species that can be seen along, and in, the river – several of which we were lucky enough to see on our paddle.  There are 34 species of Mussels that have been found in the Sydenham River (11 of which are on the species at risk list) – more mussel species than any other body of water in Canada! The Sydenham also has 83 species of fish, many of the turtle species that can be found in Ontario (all of which are at risk) and many bird species.

As we talked about the importance of the Sydenham River a Green Heron flew right toward the group – it was a great sight as usually these birds fly away from you, not toward you!  A little further down Bear Creek we spotted the Great Horned Owl – which we got to see several more times – what a treat.  We also saw several Map and Painted Turtles, muskrats, Great Blue Herons, Spotted Sandpipers, and many other bird species.

Everyone who came out enjoyed the paddle.  A big Thank You to Dawn Mumford and the Wallaceburg Canoeing Club for providing canoes for the outing.

(Photo credits: Tricia Mclellan and Paul DeLaDurantaye)

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Bear Creek is a beautiful tree-lined river with many opportunities to see birds, turtles, and other wildlife.  Please join us as we meander along this ecologically important waterway.

If you are interested in participating in this canoe/kayak outing please contact Roberta Buchanan at roberta.buchanan@icloud.com or phone 519-864-1475.

Date:  June 2, 2018

Place:  Wilkesport boat launch

Time: 9:30 am – 12 noon

What to Bring:  water, insect repellent, hat, sunscreen (Safety equipment will be provided by the Wallaceburg Canoe Club)

The Wallaceburg Canoe club is providing the canoes so the number of participants needing a canoe is necessary.  If you are bringing your own canoe please let us know. 

For more information on location and what to expect please visit: http://lambtonwildlife.com/blog/natural-areas/paddle-the-sydenham-river/

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Sunday offered amazing viewing of several thousand Tundra Swans along Greenway Road just North of The Lambton Heritage Museum!  There was also good viewing along many of the side roads in the area – we randomly took roads around the area and in every flooded field there were hundreds of Swans.  These striking beauties migrate from the south to the Arctic to breed each year.  They breed on lakes and ponds in Alaska and Canada, preferring wetlands and lakes with long shorelines where they feed on plant matter (and some mollusks and arthropods).

During migration we are lucky enough to have upwards of 15,000 birds stop-over in Lambton County for anywhere from 15 to 30 days.  They began arriving on March 1 so there should be good viewing for at least one more week.  Normally the swans will start to dwindle in number as early as March 8 with most gone by the end of March.

If you have the time it is well worth seeing these magnificent birds resting before their long flight north!