Carl Pascoe and Rachel Powless recently spoke as our November guest speakers. Carl is a Master Bander and NTARP’s Research Director, while Rachel is a Bird Bander and the President of NTARP (Native Territories Avian Research Project). Below are excerpts from their 2016 Spring Migration Banding report that was written and sent to the City of Sarnia Parks Department and Lambton Wildlife Inc.

Profound thanks to the City of Sarnia Parks Department, Lambton Wildlife Inc., especially Larry Cornelis for the opportunity to band birds at Canatara Park. Our success could not have been accomplished without the outpouring of Lambton Wildlife volunteers. Every day volunteers were at the ready from set-up to tear-down. Four-thirty in the morning comes early and the cold, wind and rain did not deter our group. It took very little time after our nets were down to become in sync. We very much appreciated both the inimitable assistance and comradery of our fellow birders.

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler

In their report they commented on how much they enjoyed sharing the educational process with the community and children, in particular. There was an abundance of female Yellow-rumped Warblers banded and they found Canatara to have a healthy population of Downy Woodpeckers.

Juvenile Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Juvenile Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Two Ruby-throated Hummingbirds were banded, which seemed to bring “oohs, aahs and smiles” from the crowd.

Sharp-shinned Hawk

Sharp-shinned Hawk

A Sharp-shinned Hawk was also banded and created quite a bit of excitement.

There were a total of 184 birds of 30 different species banded in the four days (two separate weekends). 91 of those banded were female Yellow-rumped Warblers.

White-throated Sparrow

White-throated Sparrow

The Western Palm Warbler was the next most banded species, followed by the White-throated Sparrow. Both of these birds were migrating through to more northern breeding grounds.

We look forward to further collaborative efforts between Native Territories Avian Research Project (NTARP), the City of Sarnia and Lambton Wildlife Inc. in the future. If you were able to attend and/or assist us, thank you and hope to see you the next time. We appreciate feedback on how we did and what we can do to improve our process. We can
be contacted at NTARP1@aol.com .

Respectively submitted,

Carl A. Pascoe NTARP Master Bander, Research Director
Rachel A. Powless NTARP President, Bird Bander

 

About Author

Connect with Me:

One Comment

  • Mike Kent

    I had alot of fun volunteering with Carl and Rachel, even considering the weather. The photos in this post do a great job showing off the rewarding close looks you get off the birds. Even common, seemingly drab birds can be appreciated on a new level you can’t get with any set of binoculars or scope. Looking forward to helping collect more valuable data on bird migration in the area next year!

    • 7:52 pm - December 8, 2016

    • Reply

Leave a Reply