Featuring the Teenage Tree Program, a Native Tree Sale and HUB Open House!
Teens and Trees Helping to Reforest Sarnia-Lambton

 

When: Saturday October 19, 2019 from 10 am to 4 pm

Where: At Rebound’s THE HUB – St. Luke’s United Church – 350 Indian Road South, Sarnia

The HUB will be hosting a native tree sale in support of youth mental wellness. Return the Landscape, Maajiigin Gumig (Aamjiwnaang First Nations’ native plant greenhouse), the HUB and the Unitarian Fellowship of Sarnia and Port Huron have joined forces to grow a diverse selection of locally sourced native trees.

Together, the above organizations are starting a Teenage Tree Program for youth to collect seeds, care and grow tree saplings for fundraising. Through this eco-fundraiser, local youth will have an opportunity to re-connect with nature while promoting the re-forestation of our community.

We live in the most “tree rich” region of Canada. We have over 70 species in our local Carolinian zone ecosystem. https://caroliniancanada.ca/legacy/FactSheets_CCUniqueness.htm.

Reforestation is considered to be one of the top 10 most effective strategies to address climate change. Not only is carbon sequestered but biodiversity is protected.

Trees for sale at this event will be Carolinian species with information tables and presentations on the value of native trees. People can either purchase native tree saplings for their yard and/or sponsor trees for a community park planting day on Sunday, November 2nd.

Join us for a tour of the HUB, a safe space with support services for youth ages 16 to 24. The HUB is operated by Sarnia-Lambton Rebound with at least 31 community agencies collaborating to co-create youth services and programs. The HUB will be open for a tour as well as the tree sales. Proceeds from the sale will be invested in the HUB, the native plant greenhouse and local reforestation efforts.

In addition, people can learn more about the Teenage Tree Program as we continue developing this eco-fundraiser for Sarnia-Lambton.
A barbeque and refreshments will be offered.

For more information contact Returnthelandscape@gmail.com or 519 464-6544.

 

Sydenham River Nature Reserve Tree Planting

On October 5, twenty enthusiastic naturalist from Lambton Wildlife Inc. (LWI) and Sydenham Field Naturalists (SFN) planted more than a thousand tree seeds, as another step toward restoring Sydenham River Nature Reserve (SRNR) to its natural state.  Oak, Hickory, Beech, Ironwood, along with other tree species were planted; all from seeds that were gathered from SRNR. The purchase of this property, by Ontario Nature, was made possible by the generous donations from both LWI and SFN.  Both LWI and SFN continue to support SRNR by being stewards of the property, and with on-going donations towards its restoration.

 

An afternoon get together for the LWI board members took place at Canatara Park recently and there was a lot of delicious food and good conversation. The weather stopped any hopes of an afternoon walk through the park but there was plenty of things to talk about and interesting food to enjoy.

If you are interested in joining the Board or have any questions, feel free to PM us!

Some quick details:
🐢Terms are 3 years in length and start in May
🐢We meet once monthly on a weekday evening with meetings lasting typically 2 hours
🐢There are 5 spots available each year (with 15 members total so there’s lots of support from experienced board members to anyone new)
🐢 You do not need to be a subject matter expert to be a Board Member as the role is more administrative.
🐢 But mostly… it’s just a great way to meet other members, share your ideas, and contribute to our great Club

Here are some pictures of your board members enjoying themselves before the new year starts.

See you in September!

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This March, we will be keeping a lookout for Tundra Swans that migrate to the area. If we are lucky enough to witness this spectacular wildlife event, we will send a notification to 𝘠𝘰𝘶𝘯𝘨 𝘕𝘢𝘵𝘶𝘳𝘢𝘭𝘪𝘴𝘵 𝘊𝘭𝘶𝘣 𝘔𝘦𝘮𝘣𝘦𝘳𝘴 with further details of the TBD pop-up event.

𝘞𝘩𝘦𝘳𝘦 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘸𝘩𝘦𝘯 𝘸𝘦 𝘮𝘦𝘦𝘵 𝘸𝘪𝘭𝘭 𝘣𝘦 𝘛𝘉𝘋 𝘣𝘺 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘴𝘸𝘢𝘯𝘴. 𝘈𝘵 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘭𝘰𝘤𝘢𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯, 𝘺𝘰𝘶 𝘤𝘢𝘯 𝘮𝘦𝘦𝘵 𝘸𝘪𝘵𝘩 𝘰𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳 𝘺𝘰𝘶𝘯𝘨 𝘯𝘢𝘵𝘴 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘰𝘯𝘦 𝘰𝘧 𝘰𝘶𝘳 𝘭𝘦𝘢𝘥𝘦𝘳𝘴 𝘸𝘩𝘰 𝘸𝘪𝘭𝘭 𝘩𝘢𝘷𝘦 𝘕𝘰𝘷𝘢 𝘊𝘩𝘦𝘮𝘪𝘤𝘢𝘭𝘴 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘝𝘰𝘳𝘵𝘦𝘹 𝘣𝘪𝘯𝘰𝘤𝘶𝘭𝘢𝘳𝘴 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘶𝘴𝘦!

Typically the best location is a field behind the Lambton County Heritage Museum. For more info about our local Tundra Swan Migration visit: https://www.lambtonmuseums.ca/lambton-heritage-museum/annual-events/return-swans-festival-new/tundra-swan-migration/

𝘛𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘪𝘴 𝘢 𝘨𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘵 𝘸𝘢𝘺 𝘵𝘰 𝘮𝘦𝘦𝘵 𝘰𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳 𝘧𝘢𝘮𝘪𝘭𝘪𝘦𝘴 𝘸𝘩𝘪𝘭𝘦 𝘦𝘹𝘱𝘭𝘰𝘳𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘓𝘢𝘮𝘣𝘵𝘰𝘯 𝘊𝘰𝘶𝘯𝘵𝘺’𝘴 𝘯𝘢𝘵𝘶𝘳𝘦!

Enroll your family today by filling out this electronic form:

LWI Young Nats Electronic Enrollment Form

Another successful Downriver Ducks outing was enjoyed by 25 enthusiastic Lambton Wildlife members. A big thank you to Paul Carter who led the trip and pointed out many interesting waterfowl. The trip started at the Blue Water Bridge where we saw thousands of long-tail ducks, along with many other species of waterfowl. The group then moved on to Guthrie Park where we were able to see Swans, Redhead, Canvasback, Common Merganser, Bufflehead, Canada Geese, Common Goldeneye, Mallard, and of course everyone’s favorite Bald Eagles. In total we saw five eagles over the morning and were lucky enough to see two of the eagles interacting! We had two more stops where we enjoyed watching the many waterfowl and then ended in Sombra for lunch. Thanks also to Sean for pointing out a hybrid duck (Redhead x Ring-necked duck).

LWI members gather before heading out

Monday, January 28 is the LWI Annual Member’s Photofest

Four LWI members will be showing off some of their favorite nature photos at our Member’s Photofest Night.  Past events have been a real treat as we all get a chance to view some of the amazing images our members capture during their forays into natural areas.  It’s a natural way to kick off our first indoor meeting of the New Year, so please plan to attend.  Social time begins at 7:00 PM.

Gerry Clements, one of the founding members of Lambton Wildllife Inc. has shared the historical document 35th Anniversary of Lambton Wildlife Inc.  LWI has an incredible history in Lambton County beginning with a commitment to participate, on an annual basis, in a national resident bird count.  In 1970 LWI became a Land Trust and in 1972 purchased Mandaumin Woods Nature Reserve after two years of fundraising.  In 1980 LWI identified the Wawanosh area as an important natural area to be preserved and in 1983 a donation of $10,000 was made to the St. Clair Conservation Authority toward its purchase.

In 1986 LWI once again recognized an area in need of protection and committed to fundraising for the Karner Blue Sanctuary.  The Karner Blue Sanctuary was officially opened in 1988, housing the last viable population of the rare and beautiful Karner Blue Butterfly in Canada. 1988 was a busy year as fundraising continued and money was donated to pay for the management of The Howard Watson Nature Trail (spearheaded and managed by LWI at the time).

In 1991, LWI led a project to provide funds for a mollusk survey on the Sydenham River,  providing important scientific data to researchers.  In 1994, LWI’s Plan to support the Carolinian Canada organization was fulfilled with a donation of $23,000 towards the acquisition of two properties purchased by Nature Conservancy Canada; the Port Franks Forested Dunes Nature Reserve and the Van Valkenburg property.

In 2000, LWI entered into a long term agreement with Lambton County Library to establish a research and reference collection concerning all aspects of flora and fauna pertinent to Lambton County.

This is just a few of the highlights of the first 35 years of Lambton Wildlife.  You can find the complete publication by clicking the following link (Lambton Wildlife 35 years PDF) or see below.

 

Any young birders or students interested in birds and nature who are enrolled in pre-K, grade school, middle school or high school can download the new version 7.7 of Thayer’s Birds of North America – for FREE.

Just visit www.ThayerBirding.com, select the Windows or the Mac download and enter our special code: LambtonWildlifeYoungBirder Then click the Apply button and Free Checkout.

This amazing birding software, for Windows or Mac computers, features the 1,007 birds that have been seen in the continental United States and Canada. The software includes 6,856 color photos, 1,506 songs and calls, 552 video clips of birds in action, 700 quizzes and much, much more. Use the ID Wizard to identify unknown birds in your yard. Keep track of the birds you see. Compare any two birds side-by-side. Read all about the bird’s nests, eggs, feeding habits and more.

Thayer Birding Software’s founder, Peter Thayer, decided that this would be the perfect way to celebrate his 70th birthday!

“It is time to give back something to the birding community and to the millions of young birders (and potential young birders) who just need a spark to get them started on a life-long quest for knowledge about our natural world and the importance of preserving the habitat we still have. What better way than this to celebrate the year of the bird? Our goal is to give away one million free copies of the birding program to kids everywhere.”

Are you the local bird expert?  You soon will be!

College and grad school students, use the code STUDENT for a 50% discount. Teachers use the code TEACHER for a 50% discount. 

Wildlife professionals can get a 50% discount by using the WILDLIFE.

Almost 50 LWI members and friends joined leader Mike Kent today for a fascinating morning hike learning about mushrooms along the Lambton Heritage Forest trail.  A beautiful sunny sky accented the fall colours along the route while Mike provided detailed information about various fungi which could be observed less than a meter from the trail.  Binoculars and field guides were provided to help participants identify the mushrooms.  Mike made the event fun while also being extremely informative; there was something for everyone: from mushroom novices all the way to fungi aficionados.  There is little doubt this popular annual event will be repeated!  Thanks Mike for the extensive preparation and excellent event.

On Monday evening, September 24th, join Lambton Wildlife for a presentation on Sturgeon in the Great Lakes. Social gathering goes from 7:00 to 7:30pm with the presentation starting soon after.

Research surrounding lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) feeding ecology in the Great Lakes is dated compared to other aspects of their ecology, despite their threatened status. Recent research has demonstrated different migration strategies exist in lake sturgeon from the Lake Huron-to-Lake Erie corridor (HEC), but dietary links are lacking in this system. Additionally, food web structures have been known to shift with new biological invasions, however little is known about the effects they have on native species found within the HEC. These knowledge gaps led to the question of whether or not lake sturgeon feeding ecology varies both temporally and spatially within the HEC. This interdisciplinary approach of combining movement and feeding ecology can be applied to other species and other study systems.