Almost 50 LWI members and friends joined leader Mike Kent today for a fascinating morning hike learning about mushrooms along the Lambton Heritage Forest trail.  A beautiful sunny sky accented the fall colours along the route while Mike provided detailed information about various fungi which could be observed less than a meter from the trail.  Binoculars and field guides were provided to help participants identify the mushrooms.  Mike made the event fun while also being extremely informative; there was something for everyone: from mushroom novices all the way to fungi aficionados.  There is little doubt this popular annual event will be repeated!  Thanks Mike for the extensive preparation and excellent event.

On Monday evening, September 24th, join Lambton Wildlife for a presentation on Sturgeon in the Great Lakes. Social gathering goes from 7:00 to 7:30pm with the presentation starting soon after.

Research surrounding lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) feeding ecology in the Great Lakes is dated compared to other aspects of their ecology, despite their threatened status. Recent research has demonstrated different migration strategies exist in lake sturgeon from the Lake Huron-to-Lake Erie corridor (HEC), but dietary links are lacking in this system. Additionally, food web structures have been known to shift with new biological invasions, however little is known about the effects they have on native species found within the HEC. These knowledge gaps led to the question of whether or not lake sturgeon feeding ecology varies both temporally and spatially within the HEC. This interdisciplinary approach of combining movement and feeding ecology can be applied to other species and other study systems.

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Hawk Cliff is recognized as one of the prime fall migration hawk watching destinations in all North America.

 

Every year hundreds of birders (and non-birders!) from Canada, the U.S. and other countries visit Hawk Cliff. Birders can normally expect to see 15 different raptor species, with typical count totals reaching several thousand birds per day. On a few exceptional occasions lucky visitors have witnessed the amazing spectacle of over 100,000 raptors of various species migrating past Hawk Cliff in a single day!

Others come to enjoy the many song birds and Monarchs that also pass Hawk Cliff on their journey to warmer climes, or to walk the beautiful trails of Hawk Cliff Woods. This is a stunning 230 acre property and is one of the most significant deep interior forests in Elgin County. Hawk Cliff Woods is a maple-beech forest with many Carolinian specialties, including the Tulip-tree and Pignut Hickory as well as the Endangered Butternut and American Chestnut.   Rare birds such as Eastern Wood-Pewee, Acadian Flycatcher, Louisiana Waterthrush, and Wood Thrush thrive in the deep woods.

Please Contact Roberta Buchanan at roberta.buchanan@icloud.com or by phone 519-864-1475.

Date:  September 22, 2018

Place:  Lambton Mall parking lot – Carpooling is an option as it is an 80 minute drive.

Time: 8:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.  (bring your lunch or visit nearby Port Stanley for lunch)

Daily Live-bird Demos at 11a.m. and 2 p.m.

What to Bring:  water, insect repellent, hat, sunscreen, lawn chair, binoculars, lunch

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Point Pelee National Park is an amazing park filled with natural wonders. There is a large diversity of habitats, from the sheltered canopy of the southern Carolinian forest to the expansive sea of cattails in the marsh. In autumn, songbird migration is in full swing, while dragonflies and Monarch butterflies drift by.

 

For further information visit the Lambton Wildlife Website: http://lambtonwildlife.com/blog/point-pelee-national-park-camping-trip-2017/

Please Contact:

Paul Carter at 519-466-8555.

Date:  September 4-7, 2018 (Please note the change in dates from the program)

Place:  Point Pelee National Park

Time:   Anytime Tuesday through Friday – When you arrive at the front gate let them know that you are with the Lambton Wildlife Group

What to Bring:  Camping gear, bicycles, canoe (if you have one – rentals are available)

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What a beautiful day for a paddle!  The weather looked threatening but by 9:30 it had cleared up and the sun even came out.  We began our paddle at the Wilkesport Boat launch and a few minutes after leaving we were lucky enough to see a muskrat swimming along the shore.

Where the Sydenham splits into Bear and Black Creek we stopped and talked about the numerous species that can be seen along, and in, the river – several of which we were lucky enough to see on our paddle.  There are 34 species of Mussels that have been found in the Sydenham River (11 of which are on the species at risk list) – more mussel species than any other body of water in Canada! The Sydenham also has 83 species of fish, many of the turtle species that can be found in Ontario (all of which are at risk) and many bird species.

As we talked about the importance of the Sydenham River a Green Heron flew right toward the group – it was a great sight as usually these birds fly away from you, not toward you!  A little further down Bear Creek we spotted the Great Horned Owl – which we got to see several more times – what a treat.  We also saw several Map and Painted Turtles, muskrats, Great Blue Herons, Spotted Sandpipers, and many other bird species.

Everyone who came out enjoyed the paddle.  A big Thank You to Dawn Mumford and the Wallaceburg Canoeing Club for providing canoes for the outing.

(Photo credits: Tricia Mclellan and Paul DeLaDurantaye)

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Bear Creek is a beautiful tree-lined river with many opportunities to see birds, turtles, and other wildlife.  Please join us as we meander along this ecologically important waterway.

If you are interested in participating in this canoe/kayak outing please contact Roberta Buchanan at roberta.buchanan@icloud.com or phone 519-864-1475.

Date:  June 2, 2018

Place:  Wilkesport boat launch

Time: 9:30 am – 12 noon

What to Bring:  water, insect repellent, hat, sunscreen (Safety equipment will be provided by the Wallaceburg Canoe Club)

The Wallaceburg Canoe club is providing the canoes so the number of participants needing a canoe is necessary.  If you are bringing your own canoe please let us know. 

For more information on location and what to expect please visit: http://lambtonwildlife.com/blog/natural-areas/paddle-the-sydenham-river/

Spring Wildflowers of Reid’s Conservation Area #2

May 13, 2018 @ 12:30 pm4:00 pm

Sunday, April 29 and Sunday, May13, 2018

Meet: 12:30 pm at Lambton Mall parking lot near Canadian Tire or 1:00 pm at Reid’s CA on Duthill Road.

Join Felicia on a leisurely walk identifying the woodland wildflowers on two seperate outings to see the different wildflowers blooming. These spring ephemerals bloom before the forest canopy leafs out taking advantage of the available sunlight.

Leader: Felicia Syer-Nicol 519-402-2326

Take a tour of the new Sydenham River Nature Reserve this Saturday, May 5th, 2018.

Lambton Wildlife joins the Sydenham Field Naturalists group to walk around and explore the new reserve.

Meet at 10am at the end of Oil Springs Line, 2 kilometres east of Nauvoo Road.

Leader: Larry Cornelis 519-330-8981

Wednesday, May 2nd.

Meet: 6:00 pm at the entrance to Tarzanland

Eric will skillfully find migrating songbird for all to see and learn about. Great birding right here in Sarnia.

Leader: Eric Marcum 519-332-6122

Spring Wildflowers of Reid’s Conservation Area #1

April 29, 2018 @ 12:30 pm4:00 pm

Sunday, April 29 and Sunday, May13, 2018

Meet: 12:30 pm at Lambton Mall parking lot near Canadian Tire or 1:00 pm at Reid’s CA on Duthill Road.

Join Felicia on a leisurely walk identifying the woodland wildflowers on two seperate outings to see the different wildflowers blooming. These spring ephemerals bloom before the forest canopy leafs out taking advantage of the available sunlight.

Leader: Felicia Syer-Nicol 519-402-2326