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Bear Creek is a beautiful tree-lined river with many opportunities to see birds, turtles, and other wildlife.  Please join us as we meander along this ecologically important waterway.

If you are interested in participating in this canoe/kayak outing please contact Roberta Buchanan at roberta.buchanan@icloud.com or phone 519-864-1475.

Date:  June 2, 2018

Place:  Wilkesport boat launch

Time: 9:30 am – 12 noon

What to Bring:  water, insect repellent, hat, sunscreen (Safety equipment will be provided by the Wallaceburg Canoe Club)

The Wallaceburg Canoe club is providing the canoes so the number of participants needing a canoe is necessary.  If you are bringing your own canoe please let us know. 

For more information on location and what to expect please visit: http://lambtonwildlife.com/blog/natural-areas/paddle-the-sydenham-river/

Spring Wildflowers of Reid’s Conservation Area #2

May 13, 2018 @ 12:30 pm4:00 pm

Sunday, April 29 and Sunday, May13, 2018

Meet: 12:30 pm at Lambton Mall parking lot near Canadian Tire or 1:00 pm at Reid’s CA on Duthill Road.

Join Felicia on a leisurely walk identifying the woodland wildflowers on two seperate outings to see the different wildflowers blooming. These spring ephemerals bloom before the forest canopy leafs out taking advantage of the available sunlight.

Leader: Felicia Syer-Nicol 519-402-2326

Take a tour of the new Sydenham River Nature Reserve this Saturday, May 5th, 2018.

Lambton Wildlife joins the Sydenham Field Naturalists group to walk around and explore the new reserve.

Meet at 10am at the end of Oil Springs Line, 2 kilometres east of Nauvoo Road.

Leader: Larry Cornelis 519-330-8981

Wednesday, May 2nd.

Meet: 6:00 pm at the entrance to Tarzanland

Eric will skillfully find migrating songbird for all to see and learn about. Great birding right here in Sarnia.

Leader: Eric Marcum 519-332-6122

Spring Wildflowers of Reid’s Conservation Area #1

April 29, 2018 @ 12:30 pm4:00 pm

Sunday, April 29 and Sunday, May13, 2018

Meet: 12:30 pm at Lambton Mall parking lot near Canadian Tire or 1:00 pm at Reid’s CA on Duthill Road.

Join Felicia on a leisurely walk identifying the woodland wildflowers on two seperate outings to see the different wildflowers blooming. These spring ephemerals bloom before the forest canopy leafs out taking advantage of the available sunlight.

Leader: Felicia Syer-Nicol 519-402-2326

Camping and birding on Pelee Island is coming up fast. Just under a month to plan for the spring migration adventure!

Thursday, May 10th to Sunday, May 13th.

If you haven’t contacted Dick Wilson yet, please do so soon.

You should also be calling to make reservations for your ferry trip across.

Call 1-800-661-2220 to make a reservation and get your binoculars out!

 

Puddle Ducks

March 31, 2018 @ 9:00 am2:00 pm

Meet: 9:00 am at the Clearwater Arena or 10:00 am at the St Clair National Wildlife area. Tens of thousands of ducks and other waterfowl use the Lake St. Clair wetlands as a migratory stop over. In this case, we will be viewing mainly puddle ducks (aka dabblers) such as American widgeon, northern shoveler, wood duck and pintail to name a few. Lunch at Mitchell’s Bay.

Leader: Deryl Nethercott

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Well, the weather outside was frightful, and most people decided to stay home and stay safe. But a few of us showed up anyway and had a nice morning, in spite of the weather!

We drove along the river, stopping at a few spots to look for waterfowl. We travelled as far as Sombra and then wisely called it a day.

We managed to see 20 bald eagles and 11 kinds of ducks; Redheads, Canvasbacks, Buffleheads, Long-tails, Common Goldeneyes, Common Red-breasted and Hooded Mergansers, Scaups and a scoter. We even saw one Ring-necked Duck.

Hooded Merganser in the snow.

 

 

Down River Ducks and Eagles

February 4, 2018 @ 9:00 am5:00 pm

Meet 9:00 am at the Centennial Park parking lot. This is our most popular outing. See waterfowl including diving ducks, geese and swans, as well as different gull species and bald eagles. Lunch at a restaurant in Sombra.

Leader: Paul Carter 519-466-8555

Twenty three LWI members ventured out on a cool fall day to walk the nature trail on the Fairbank Oil property just outside of Oil Springs.  Larry Cornelis led the hike and the group was fortunate to also have the property owners Charlie Fairbank and Pat McGee accompany us to provide some wonderful stories about the history of the property and the oil industry, as well as to explain the various oil production devices and artifacts found along the trail.  Charlie’s ancestors were prominent in the oil business dating back to the first oil wells.

The Fairbank property sits above the large oil field that spawned the oil exploration and extraction industry in the mid 1850’s, and the field continues to produce oil to this day from numerous wells located all over the property.  Many small oil pumps are visible along the trail, dutifully moving up and down to pull the crude oil up from a depth of close to 400 feet.  The unique aspect of the Fairbank approach to oil extraction is that many of these oil wells are using technology from the 1800’s.  The site is being considered as a Unesco World Heritage Site, and Charlie had recently returned from Ottawa where he made a presentation in support of the application.

Vintage Oil Well Pump

The trail entrance, with parking, is located on Gypsy Flats side road just south of Oil Springs Line.  The well-maintained trail meanders through prairie and riparian areas along Black Creek.  There are numerous signs indicating sections of the trail that are named for historical figures from the local oil industry.  A sturdy and attractive bridge crosses Black Creek and we were told that birds nest under it each year.  Larry Cornelis has conducted wildlife surveys on the property over several years, with many species being observed.  Although not many birds, insects or animals were seen on this day, it’s certain that in spring and summer there would be lots to see.  Tallgrass prairie species have been planted in many of the areas of this trail, with plans to continue to naturalize the property.

 

 

 

It’s a breath of fresh air when generous people allow the public to access their property and enjoy the natural beauty that resides there.   We appreciate the creation of this nature trail and encourage all LWI members to visit.

Further information about the history of the local oil industry can be found by visiting the Oil Museum of Canada, located a very short distance from this nature trail. https://www.lambtonmuseums.ca/oil/