Monday, January 28 is the LWI Annual Member’s Photofest

Four LWI members will be showing off some of their favorite nature photos at our Member’s Photofest Night.  Past events have been a real treat as we all get a chance to view some of the amazing images our members capture during their forays into natural areas.  It’s a natural way to kick off our first indoor meeting of the New Year, so please plan to attend.  Social time begins at 7:00 PM.

Thanks to Lambton Wildlife member Mario Aquilina for sending in some gorgeous shots of some local turtles that are enjoying the warm weather and sunshine.

Painted Turtles courtesy of Mario Aquilina, 2018.

Snapping turtle at Pinery Provincial Park, May 1, 2018. Courtesy of Mario Aquilina.

 

Do you have nature or wildlife spottings you’d like to share and post on the Lambton Wildlife website?

Click the “Submit a Picture” button below to share with everyone!

 

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One of the first warblers to return each spring to Lambton County is the Yellow-Rumped Warbler. I saw my first one this year on April the 12th. The first warbler sighting causes many things. The first being calls and texts to my birding friends. The second thing that happens is a daily, and sometimes hourly check of the weather to see when I can go out next. It’s the most exciting time of year!

Yellow – Rumped Warbler

Since the 12th, plenty more migrating birds have been spotted by the many local birders. Gold-crowned and Ruby-Crowned Kinglets have started to arrive. Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers are being spied in the woods. Bluebirds checking out nesting boxes and Northern Flickers are probing the frosty ground.

Time to get out there and see what is coming next.

You never know what you will find. And don’t let the weather stop you. It’s not stopping the birds!

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Sunday offered amazing viewing of several thousand Tundra Swans along Greenway Road just North of The Lambton Heritage Museum!  There was also good viewing along many of the side roads in the area – we randomly took roads around the area and in every flooded field there were hundreds of Swans.  These striking beauties migrate from the south to the Arctic to breed each year.  They breed on lakes and ponds in Alaska and Canada, preferring wetlands and lakes with long shorelines where they feed on plant matter (and some mollusks and arthropods).

During migration we are lucky enough to have upwards of 15,000 birds stop-over in Lambton County for anywhere from 15 to 30 days.  They began arriving on March 1 so there should be good viewing for at least one more week.  Normally the swans will start to dwindle in number as early as March 8 with most gone by the end of March.

If you have the time it is well worth seeing these magnificent birds resting before their long flight north!

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It has been an amazing couple of weeks with the return of Red-winged Blackbirds, Killdeer, Turkey Vultures, Common Grackles, Eastern Bluebirds, Eastern Meadowlarks, and Sandhill Cranes.  We have been lucky enough to see all of these returnees and it makes us think of spring!

We saw our first Killdeers, Red-winged Blackbirds, Common Grackles, and Turkey Vultures in mid-February.  On February 26 we were lucky enough to see three male Eastern Bluebirds looking to scout out the best habitat.

On March 1 we saw a pair of Eastern Meadowlarks – in full breeding colours – and they stayed around for three days!  Their beautiful flute-like songs certainly made it seem like spring had arrived even though they were singing in the snow!

Also migrating through are the Tundra Swans and the Sandhill Cranes on their way to their summer breeding grounds.

Enjoy the sights and sounds of the returning birds – spring is just around the corner!

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Here in Lambton County we are off to a great winter birding season! On November 22nd we were treated to a Harlequin Duck sighting! The picture doesn’t do it justice. It was out in the lake in the company of 2 goldeneye ducks and in front of about 600-800 redhead ducks. We know it was around the following day too, from e-bird reports.

The Harlequin Duck is uncommon in Lambton County, spending most of its time on the west and east coasts.  Just about every year, one or two will be seen in Lambton County.

 

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We enjoy canoeing on the Sydenham River in the spring and summer, but probably our favourite season for paddling this river is autumn.  This year the month of October had warmer than normal weather and we took advantage of a forecasted picture perfect day with no wind and sunny skies for our last paddle of the season.  Heading upstream (north) from near Wilkesport, the north branch of the Sydenham River begins where Black Creek and Bear Creek merge.  Either of these tributaries is interesting so we paddled both.  Trees on the riverbank were showing their fall colours and leaves floated on the river going neither north nor south as there is very little current this time of year.  Temperatures were comfortable and the bright sun sparkled on the water’s surface.

 

Coming around the first bend in Bear Creek, we spotted a group of Wood Ducks in the water under an overhanging tree.  They didn’t notice us and we were able to glide closer and see what we believe were first fall males along with adult males and females.  It was a great juxtaposition between the young and mature males: the juveniles are colorful, but their feathers look scruffier.  The adult male however is a gentleman of distinction; beautiful colors and smooth overall.   Before we got any closer than 60 meters the group took off and headed upstream.  We saw them again from a distance, but then they were wary of us and we never got close again.

Wood Duck (Aix sponsa)

 

Wood Duck adult male

Great Blue Herons were abundant on both creeks; we observed at least five individuals, all immatures.  These birds typically enjoy having long sections of the river to themselves and in some cases they clearly didn’t appreciate the proximity of other Herons, vocally scolding the heron who encroached into their range.  We were lucky enough to watch a Great Blue Heron catch a fish; close enough (40 meters) for decent photos but far enough not to disturb the bird.  The herons stand motionless, and then lunge into the water with startling speed to snatch an unsuspecting fish.

Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias)

 

The Herons also put on quite a show in flight, with their plumage reflecting the bright blue sky and fall colored leaves in the background.  It’s amazing to see the way individual flight feathers are used when the bird is landing.

Great Blue Herons have specialized feathers on their chest that continually grow and fray. The herons comb this “powder down” with a fringed claw on their middle toes, using the down like a washcloth to remove fish slime and other oils from their feathers as they preen. Applying the powder to their underparts protects their feathers against the slime and oils of swamps.

 

Great Blue Herons are excellent fishers.  They exhibit great patience, standing very still in shallow water or on the shore, waiting for a fish or frog to stray too near.  Sometimes the Herons stand on one leg, which doesn’t appear to affect their ability to remain motionless.

For the most part, despite the near silence of a canoe, it’s hard to approach ducks much closer than 75 meters and the Mallards we saw were no exception.  At the first glimpse of the boat they would burst into the air in a flurry of water drops and wingbeats.

Along the riverbanks we observed numerous small birds, Ruby-crowned and Golden-crowned Kinglets, Yellow-rumped Warblers, Robins, a few different species of Sparrows, American Goldfinch, Belted Kingfisher, Northern Flicker, Red-bellied Woodpecker, Red-tailed Hawks, Turkey Vultures, Eastern Phoebe, Northern Cardinals, Blue Jays.

 

After five hours of paddling up and downstream, we were back to where we put in, a Red-tailed Hawk soared overhead in a cloudless sky making his trademark shriek.  Another awesome fall canoe trip was over.  We highly recommend canoeing the Sydenham; it’s truly a hidden gem of Lambton County.  For more information on this river and how to locate the boat launch site, please refer to our post from last year: http://lambtonwildlife.com/blog/natural-areas/paddle-the-sydenham-river/

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Nov 13, 2017 Purple Sandpiper Kettle Point Ontario

First comes the text…purple sandpiper Kettle Point…then the draw in of breath… “can I do this?” I have a full day of housecleaning, laundry, grocery shopping….. But it’s a PURPLE SANDPIPER! I’ve only ever seen two before, in 10 years of birding…and they were both in Niagara Falls! And I’m off work today!!! What are the chances it will be here on my next day off? Purple Sandpiper… not going to chance it! I look at my husband “off you go” he says “find your bird”. Text to Deryl in the car…’15 minutes’.

And yes it was worth it!

Thanks to LWI members Deryl Nethercott who sent the text and George MacDermid who let me stand in his back/front yard to see it!

 

 

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[eBird Alert] Needs Alert for Lambton County <daily>

[eBird Alert] Lambton County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

It starts so innocently. An e bird alert…but wait- Ross’s Geese..in Sarnia….

A report from the day before greets me on my email the next morning. Ross’s geese, not just one, but geese reported at Hiawatha Horse Park! Just around the Corner. I haven’t seen a Ross’s Goose for 2 years.

Bino’s- check

Camera- check

Spotting Scope- check

Phone- check

And away I go…..

2 adults and 5 juveniles!

 

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Fall is a spectacular time to paddle!  We were fortunate to have a picture perfect day to canoe through the Sydenham River Nature Reserve.

The water levels were very low (see below) which meant getting out of our canoe often but both the weather and the water were very warm.  In the spring the water level is high and there are rapids and a swift current to contend with so this would not be the time of year for novice canoeist to paddle through the Reserve.

Picturesque scenery was the word of the day and we enjoyed an interesting array of flora and fauna as we paddled.

The Sydenham River Nature Reserve is home to an incredible 34 species of mussel, 11 of which are listed as at-risk; making it the freshwater mussel capital of Canada!  Freshwater mussels are the longest-lived invertebrates. They are living water filters moving as much as eight gallons of water per day in through their siphon and over their gills to get oxygen and food.  This makes mussels exceptionally vulnerable to water pollution so the importance of keeping the Sydenham River and its ecosystem protected is of paramount importance.

Mussels move by extending their foot out of their shell and into the river bottom, then they retract the foot and pull themselves along.  In the photo below you can see the furrow that this mussel has made as it moved to a new location.

One of the highlights of the paddle was visiting the huge Sycamore tree that is in the reserve.  Ontario’s largest recorded Sycamore tree, near Alvinston, measures 263 cm at breast height.

The biodiversity found in the Sydenham River is impressive and we were thrilled to see so many butterflies, dragonflies, damselflies (including the American Rubyspot pictured below), waterfowl (a pair of American Widgeons are pictured below), and many other birds (the Bald Eagle pictured below flew past us several times and landed along the river to watch our progress).