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We enjoy canoeing on the Sydenham River in the spring and summer, but probably our favourite season for paddling this river is autumn.  This year the month of October had warmer than normal weather and we took advantage of a forecasted picture perfect day with no wind and sunny skies for our last paddle of the season.  Heading upstream (north) from near Wilkesport, the north branch of the Sydenham River begins where Black Creek and Bear Creek merge.  Either of these tributaries is interesting so we paddled both.  Trees on the riverbank were showing their fall colours and leaves floated on the river going neither north nor south as there is very little current this time of year.  Temperatures were comfortable and the bright sun sparkled on the water’s surface.

 

Coming around the first bend in Bear Creek, we spotted a group of Wood Ducks in the water under an overhanging tree.  They didn’t notice us and we were able to glide closer and see what we believe were first fall males along with adult males and females.  It was a great juxtaposition between the young and mature males: the juveniles are colorful, but their feathers look scruffier.  The adult male however is a gentleman of distinction; beautiful colors and smooth overall.   Before we got any closer than 60 meters the group took off and headed upstream.  We saw them again from a distance, but then they were wary of us and we never got close again.

Wood Duck (Aix sponsa)

 

Wood Duck adult male

Great Blue Herons were abundant on both creeks; we observed at least five individuals, all immatures.  These birds typically enjoy having long sections of the river to themselves and in some cases they clearly didn’t appreciate the proximity of other Herons, vocally scolding the heron who encroached into their range.  We were lucky enough to watch a Great Blue Heron catch a fish; close enough (40 meters) for decent photos but far enough not to disturb the bird.  The herons stand motionless, and then lunge into the water with startling speed to snatch an unsuspecting fish.

Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias)

 

The Herons also put on quite a show in flight, with their plumage reflecting the bright blue sky and fall colored leaves in the background.  It’s amazing to see the way individual flight feathers are used when the bird is landing.

Great Blue Herons have specialized feathers on their chest that continually grow and fray. The herons comb this “powder down” with a fringed claw on their middle toes, using the down like a washcloth to remove fish slime and other oils from their feathers as they preen. Applying the powder to their underparts protects their feathers against the slime and oils of swamps.

 

Great Blue Herons are excellent fishers.  They exhibit great patience, standing very still in shallow water or on the shore, waiting for a fish or frog to stray too near.  Sometimes the Herons stand on one leg, which doesn’t appear to affect their ability to remain motionless.

For the most part, despite the near silence of a canoe, it’s hard to approach ducks much closer than 75 meters and the Mallards we saw were no exception.  At the first glimpse of the boat they would burst into the air in a flurry of water drops and wingbeats.

Along the riverbanks we observed numerous small birds, Ruby-crowned and Golden-crowned Kinglets, Yellow-rumped Warblers, Robins, a few different species of Sparrows, American Goldfinch, Belted Kingfisher, Northern Flicker, Red-bellied Woodpecker, Red-tailed Hawks, Turkey Vultures, Eastern Phoebe, Northern Cardinals, Blue Jays.

 

After five hours of paddling up and downstream, we were back to where we put in, a Red-tailed Hawk soared overhead in a cloudless sky making his trademark shriek.  Another awesome fall canoe trip was over.  We highly recommend canoeing the Sydenham; it’s truly a hidden gem of Lambton County.  For more information on this river and how to locate the boat launch site, please refer to our post from last year: http://lambtonwildlife.com/blog/natural-areas/paddle-the-sydenham-river/

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After seeing multiple e-Bird alerts for the Dickcissel, we headed out in the morning on Friday for a short drive south to try and find this rare bird.  We found the birds on McCallum Line just a bit west of Brigden Road.  (more…)

View resident and migrant birds.

Each spring, migrant birds move through Canatara Park on their way to their nesting grounds. Walk with an expert birder to view resident and migrant birds.

The walk leader is Eric Marcum (519-332-6122).  Eric is a long time birder with experience in the NE United States, northern Canada and many hours in and around Sarnia.  Eric’s experience in hearing and identifying bird songs adds to the experience.

There are three walks scheduled starting on May 3 and continuing May 10 and May 17, 2017.  Start time at 6:00 PM.

The walk, beginning at the main entrance to Tarzan Land (south-west corner of Christina St and Cathcart Blvd), is an easy one over flat chip covered paths and sidewalks.

The walk is open to everyone without charge.  Binoculars are most useful.  Photo opportunities exist throughout the tour.

See the Tourism Sarnia-Lambton web-site www.tourismsarnialambton.com/listing for more information about Canatara Park.

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A large flock estimated at 500 of Lapland Longspurs was observed on Moore Line in Lambton County on April 26.  The birds were foraging in the stubble of agricultural land.  The number of birds is more evident when they fly up together.  These birds should be well on their way to the far north by now.

Join the winter birding fun with the annual Kettle Point / Pinery Provincial Park Christmas Bird Count. Contact us at info@lambtonwildlife.com to join one of several groups.

Dress warm and bring your binoculars to help benefit avian research and conservation.

Rachel and Carl, bird banders from Native Territories Avian Research Project, will discuss bird banding and how it is valuable in obtaining data which cannot be elicited by any other method. We will be presenting the banding results and what we learned about the birds and Canatara Park. In addition, we will talk about some of the incredible moments we had sharing this experience with those who attended. Special attention will be given to the wonderful volunteers who made this such a successful project. Possible future collaborative efforts with Canatara Park and LWI projects will be discussed. (more…)

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Jack Miner

Jack Miner (1865 – 1944)

Jack Miner, of Kingsville, Ontario, was one of the first to band birds in Canada in 1909. An American, Leon Cole, was reported banding birds a few years earlier. Records in Europe indicate bird banding activities dating back into the 1500’s. Miner was particularly interested in the migratory patterns of ducks and geese. The banding practise was activated in Canatara Park this May. No ducks or geese were banded!

 

Rachel Powless and Carl Pascoe are the bird banders and organizers of the bird banding in Canatara Park with the support of the City of Sarnia and Lambton Wildlife. (more…)

At the end of April, earlier this year, I had the opportunity to volunteer with Carl and Rachel, the operators of the Native Territories Avian Research Project (NTARP). Several members of Lambton Wildlife attended and volunteered during the two day bird banding session. They were at Canatara Park for the first time and they spent two full days, on two separate weekends, banding the local and migrating species.2016-april-30-29

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