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Get a hands-on introduction to local species of reptiles and amphibians with the help of the Maajiigin Gumig Greenhouse Technician, Kyle Williams. While on a hike we will learn about the diverse herpetofauna of SW Ontario, some of their threats, and how we can make a difference. We will be using our phones to engage youth with technology for environmental science and conservation.  

Bring boots, bug spray, notepad, snacks, and if possible a cell phone pre-loaded with “Ontario Nature’s Reptile and Amphibian Atlas App” for your own use as citizen science. Ontario Nature’s Reptile and Amphibian Atlas app identifies Ontario’s reptiles and amphibians, lets you submit sightings with ease and stores a record of your submissions.  Download the app for free before the hike. We may also use iNaturalist. Download iNaturalist app beforehand here

New binoculars for free sign-out and spotting scope available for use during the outing thanks to a partnership between Vortex Canada, Nova Chemicals, and our club!

Please RSVP and any cancellations to this event by emailing the names and ages of participants and whether they will be accompanied by a parent or guardian to m.kent@lambtonwildlife.com.   

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*NOTE MEETING LOCATION & SLIGHT TIME CHANGE*

Jr. Conservationists Event – ages 11-16

Join Lambton Wildlife’s main group and meet at 9:00 am, to discuss carpooling options with other parents at Clearwater Arena on Wellington Street, Sarnia, or 10:00 am at the St. Clair National Wildlife area. Tens of thousands of ducks and other waterfowl use the Lake St. Clair wetlands as a migratory stop-over. In this case, we will be viewing mainly puddle ducks ( aka dabblers) such as American widgeon, northern shoveler, wood duck, pintail, and many others.
New binoculars and spotting scope will be available for free sign-out for the outing thanks to a partnership between Vortex Canada, Nova Chemicals, and our club!

Eat lunch at Mitchell’s Bay.

Leader: Deryl Nethercott

Mike will serve as a subgroup leader and give an introduction to birding waterfowl for the Jr. Conservationists who attend.

Please RSVP and any cancellations to this event by emailing the names and ages of participants and whether they will be accompanied by a parent or guardian to m.kent@lambtonwildlife.com.  

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Young Naturalist and Jr. Conservationist Event – ages 6-16 – Parental supervision required.  

An introduction to the mysterious lives of Ontario’s owls. Most owl prowls typically take place late at night or early in the morning. This owl prowl hopes to take advantage of afternoon light to hike through owl habitat, learning about their behavior and adaptations along the way. Finish off by relocating by car to a nearby spot to scout for owls in the setting sun. 

Meet at Perch Creek Management Area park lot at 3pm before hiking some trails. Finish off by driving to another location along Blackwell Side Road where we will hope to see owls out at dusk. Finish by 6pm.

Be prepared to dress for wet, cold and slippery conditions and bring a flashlight/headlamp and binoculars if you have them. For those interested, snowshoes are available to rent from Sarnia public library. To reserve a pair visit: https://catalogue.lclibrary.ca/iguana/www.main.cls?v=c97386a2-914a-40c2-bd8d-df4c273175e6&p=8f1c53f0-41ad-4c28-8d9e-57e8288b0ac6#navigation 

Please RSVP and any cancellations to this event by emailing the names and ages of participants and whether they will be accompanied by a parent or guardian to m.kent@lambtonwildlife.com.   

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Lambton Wildlife Incorporated (LWI) has been protecting nature for over 50 years by bringing those with a love of nature together to work towards common goals in conservation, preservation, and protection of the natural environment in Lambton County. Through a range of programs and events we aim to foster an environment that encourages appreciating, learning, and teaching about the natural environment.  In order to continue the voice and values of LWI, we must reach out to our younger generation to provide them with positive experiences in nature.


Why Connect Kids with Nature?

Nature deficit disorder may be a coined phrase but the symptoms are real.  Today children are spending half as much time outdoors as they did 20 years ago with much of this time now devoted to viewing digital media. Time spent playing outside is correlated with increased physical activity, mental creativity, decreased aggression and better concentration in children. Recent research has also shown that children who play outside are more likely to protect nature as adults. The most direct route to caring for the environment as an adult is participating in “wild nature activities” before the age of 11. This is where we come in. (more…)