Historical Document – 35th Anniversary Publication

Historical Document – 35th Anniversary Publication

Gerry Clements, one of the founding members of Lambton Wildllife Inc. has shared the historical document 35th Anniversary of Lambton Wildlife Inc.  LWI has an incredible history in Lambton County beginning with a commitment to participate, on an annual basis, in a national resident bird count.  In 1970 LWI became a Land Trust and in 1972 purchased Mandaumin Woods Nature Reserve after two years of fundraising.  In 1980 LWI identified the Wawanosh area as an important natural area to be preserved and in 1983 a donation of $10,000 was made to the St. Clair Conservation Authority toward its purchase. In…
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Springtime in Mandaumin Woods

Springtime in Mandaumin Woods

Spring is such an incredible time of year.  As you walk through Mandaumin Woods in the springtime you will be treated to so many wonderful sights and sounds. Stop and listen to the number of different bird songs that are all around you – spring is a time when birds are migrating through Mandaumin woods and it is not unusual to see 20 or more species in a single outing!  One of my favorite groups of birds are the Warblers.  These colorful little birds find refuge in Mandaumin Woods as they find their way to breeding grounds further north.  I…
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Spring Walk in Mandaumin Woods

Spring Walk in Mandaumin Woods

On Sunday, 25 people braved the damp and cool weather to join Nick Alexander for the first of his two spring walks in Mandaumin Woods.  Nick shared a wealth of information about the trees and plants found along the trail that winds through the 25-acre LWI property. Nick provided many details on how to recognize the plants and tree species that he showed the group.  Some of the plants and trees that he pointed out included: Solomon’s Seal, False Solomon’s Seal, Goldenrod, Toothwort, Bellwort, Witch Hazel, Redbud, Leatherwood, Prickly Gooseberry, Black Current, Hepatica, various sedges, Shagbark Hickory, Blue beech, Ironwood,…
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2015 Mandaumin Woods BioBlitz Inventory

2015 Mandaumin Woods BioBlitz Inventory

Lambton Wildlife conducted an intense biological survey at Mandaumin Woods on June 20th, 2015. Local experts, with the help of Lambton Wildlife members, set out to record all living species at the site. Here were the resulting numbers with links to a list of each: Over 100 Herbaceous Plants. 16 Different Tree Species. 11 Fungi Identified. 22 Bird Species Spotted. 2 Mammals, 2 Amphibians and 1 Reptile. 10 Butterflies and 5 Various Insects.     Summary of all species recorded.
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Winter in Mandaumin Woods

Winter in Mandaumin Woods

Winter is magical time to visit Mandaumin Woods.  The sun shining through the trees casts beautiful long shadows in the glistening snow.  As you wander the trail you can see the prints of squirrels, deer, rabbits, skunks, fox, and other small rodents. In winter, voles travel in tunnels beneath the insulating snow – you can look for the tell-tale small round holes they make in the snow when they come up to the surface.  Voles look a lot like house mice – with a shorter tail and a more rounded muzzle and head.  Voles eat plants and seeds while moles…
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1975 – Mandaumin Woods Official Opening

On April 26, 1975, a cool but sunny spring day, Dr. Peter Tasker, LWI's first President, presided over the official opening of Mandaumin Woods. This was the first property purchased by Lambton Wildlife. It is a 25 acre Carolinian woodlot located just south of the village of Mandaumin. This property was dedicated to the memory of LWI Conservationist Laura Knight.  Dr. Tasker addressed the group of members and friends. There was an excellent turn out for this historic event in Lambton Wildlife's history.Gail and Eric Knight untied the rope to open the woodlot. In the background is Elizabeth Tasker, one…
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Ferns and Fungi of Mandaumin Woods

Ferns and Fungi of Mandaumin Woods

A walk through Mandaumin Woods in autumn is a bonanza of brilliant colours! Depending on when you visit the trail many different ferns and fungi can be seen; during the Mandaumin Woods bioblitz 11 different species of fungi were found (Polyporus alveolaris, Stereum ostrea, Hygrocybe punicea, Polyporus squamosus, Scutellinia scutellata, Crepidotus mollis, Pleurotus ostreatus, Hygrocybe nitida, Fuligo septica, Marasmius rotula, Panus conchatus). (more…)
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Trees of Mandaumin Woods

Trees of Mandaumin Woods

There are eleven species of trees in Mandaumin Woods, including the Shagbark Hickory (Carya ovata).  The Shagbark Hickory is interesting because of its shaggy appearance, which also makes it an easy tree to identify.  It is native to Canada and is extremely hard and dense making it very useful in making tool handles and furniture. A Wallaceburg company, Hillerich and Bradsby, once used Shagbark Hickory trees (among other kinds of wood) in the manufacture of baseball bats and other sporting equipment.  H&B were most famous for producing the Louisville Slugger Baseball bat. (more…)
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Mandaumin Woods Fall Trail

Mandaumin Woods Fall Trail

Mandaumin Woods is a beautiful nature preserve and the trail this time of year is dry and very enjoyable.  Mandaumin Woods is located just south of the village of Mandaumin on the west side of Mandaumin Road.  The bugs are mostly gone and it is the time of year to enjoy the fall colours and watch for wildlife. We saw a deer and several wild turkeys as we walked the trail; although it is hard to sneak up on anything because the leaves are dry and walking on them sounds like walking on Rice Crispies! (more…)
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Take a Walk on the Wild Side

Take a Walk on the Wild Side

Lambton Wildlife's 25-acre Mandaumin Woods is waiting for you. It is located 14.5 kilometres east of Sarnia on Mandaumin Sideroad, 1.6 kilometres south of Confederation Street on the west side of the road - (It's the square piece of forest on the left side of Mandaumin Road in the Google Map below). The woodlot is a wonderful place to take a quiet walk, birdwatch, or botanize. Over 44 species of birds have been seen in or from the woodlot, from the lowly starling to the beautiful scarlet tanager. The greatest numbers are usually seen during the spring migration. As well,…
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